Strengthening Laws On Young Parolees

The Andrews Labor Government is toughening up laws targeting the state’s most serious young offenders on parole by introducing electronic monitoring and other measures to better protect the community.

In a Victorian first, electronic bracelets will be used to better monitor young offenders and ensure they are complying with the conditions of their parole, like maintaining curfews or restricting their movements to certain areas.

Minister for Families and Children Jenny Mikakos said the Labor Government will introduce a Bill to Parliament later this year to support a trial of the program.

The Bill will also give the Youth Parole Board new powers to mandate alcohol and drug testing on young parolees, who have a history of alcohol and drug-related offending.

It is the first time young people on parole will be subject to such tests.

The new laws will apply to young offenders 16 years and older who commit serious offences such as aggravated home invasion, aggravated car jacking and culpable driving resulting in death.

The Victorian Budget 2018/19 committed $2.1 million to trial the scheme, which is modelled on similar electronic monitoring and alcohol and drug testing programs that are used in the adult parole system, under the Corrections Act 1986.

The Labor Government is cracking down on reoffending, with new laws already in effect that require mandatory conditions of parole for serious youth offenders, such as curfews or requirements that they don’t visit certain areas.

The Labor Government is ensuring that the youth justice system is modern, strong and effective with a $145 million investment in the Victorian Budget 2018/19.

Electronic monitoring is currently used for young people in other Australian and international jurisdictions.

Quotes attributable to Minister for Families and Children Jenny Mikakos

“This is part of our record investment to keep our community safe and hold young offenders to account.”

“Electronic monitoring will be a continuous reminder to some of our most serious young parolees to comply with their orders.”

“Alcohol and drug tests for young offenders with a history of substance abuse will help prevent reoffending.”